The Milagro Beanfield War

The Milagro Beanfield War❮Reading❯ ➶ The Milagro Beanfield War Author John Nichols – Jobs-in-kingston.co.uk The Milagro Beanfield WarIMDb Directed by Robert Redford With Rubn Blades, Richard Bradford, Snia Braga, Julie Carmen An accidental breakdown of a valve on the irrigation ditch launches a hot confront The Milagro Beanfield WarIMDb Directed by Robert Redford With Rubn Blades, Richard Bradford, Snia Braga, Julie Carmen An accidental breakdown of a valve on the irrigation ditch launches a hot confrontation between local farmers and corrupt authoritiesThe Milagro Beanfield War Nichols, John Livres NotRetrouvez The Milagro Beanfield War et des millions de livres en stock surAchetez neuf ou d occasionThe Milagro The Milagro PDF \ Beanfield War Livres NotRetrouvez The Milagro Beanfield War et des millions de livres en stock surAchetez neuf ou d occasion Milagro film WikipdiaThe Milagro Beanfield War FULL MOVIEWatch The Milagro Beanfield War Full Movie IN HD Visit Tlcharger In Milagro, The Milagro Beanfield War Water and Society Theatrical Trailer for The Milagro Beanfield WarCourtesy of Universal Movies Film Analysis by Kamie Powell InJohn Nichol published a novel titled The Milagro Beanfield War, a comical yet heartfelt tale of one town s resistance against a big business with political backing Fourteen years later, director Robert Redford transformed Nichol s classic tale into an inferior film Watch The Milagro Beanfield War Prime Video The Milagro Beanfield War is the best movie ever It s better than your favorite movie Old man Amarante is the best character ever He has a Peacekeeper he can drive a tractor and hangs out with an Angel Adapted by John Nichols from his book haven t read it , it was made in the late s don t remember them , a great period for filmmaking by a few accounts It has the nicest copThe Milagro Beanfield War WikipediaThe Milagro Beanfield War DVD for sale online eBay The Milagro Beanfield War movie is a delightful adaptation of the book of the same name The movie is able to communicate the resentment that many Native New Mexicans have of the outsiders who come to our state and try to change the way things have been for hundreds of years Joe Mondragon s use of our most valuable resource water by irrigating his ancestral farm raises an uproar of Carlos Riquelme Roberto Carricart Milagro Vintage The Milagro Beanfield War Actors Actress Glossy Press Photo shippingPress Photo Gov Mrs Roberto Sanchez Vilella, Puerto Rico in Washington shippingPress Photo Father Roberto Pirrone s model of ocean liner Titanic displayed shippingPhoto Actor The Milagro Beanfield War Carlos Riquel Me As Amarante X. This is my favorite damn book of all time ever. If you don't like it, I'm liable to punch you in the genitals.

Ostensibly, the book is about a water-rights squabble in a small town in New Mexico. But the book is so much more: the differences between the Mexican and American cultures, believing in miracles, political dissidence, and all of the ridiculously awesome characters that the author breathes life into.

There's Amarante Cordova, the ageless wonder who has been dying since birth, only to outlive many of his own children; there's one-armed Onofre Martinez, who claims that he lost his appendage to a butterfly; pugnacious Joe Mondragon, the pint sized protagonist who starts the whole squabble; Milo, his guilt ridden lawyer who has to reconcile his white American background with his Hispanic wife; Horsethief Shorty, the foreman at the Dancing Trout ranch and crony to main villain Ladd Devine III; and a whole assortment of special agents, water rights lawyers, body shop and plumbing shop owners, angels and car thieving senile grandmothers.

The book unfolds in a blissfully organic, sprawling way. You'll follow different characters in different chapters, as they all deal with their own trials and tribulations, usually working at cross purposes with other characters. Things build to a climax involving the whole host of characters, and for a change in a town called Miracle, the good guys win one. I know The Milagro Beanfield War is a cult classic, but based on a cursory perusal of the reviews, I’d say it’s a book that you either love or don’t. I won’t say you love it or hate it because I found very little actual animosity toward it in the negative reviews. Those readers just couldn’t seem to get into the book.

My feelings about the book are somewhere between the love and don’t love ends of the spectrum. For me, reading it was like an unsatisfying/unsuccessful romantic endeavor. Part 1 of the book was a bit tedious and confusing with the introduction of so many characters and backstory. Kind of like when you first start getting to know someone with whom you have an inclination to become romantically involved. You get a lot of information about the person’s family, friends, and past life, but most of it just sails past you because you want to know about the person rather than all the peripheral stuff. I came close to giving up on the book at this stage. The main reason I didn’t is because when you grew up in New Mexico and currently live here, it’s hard to admit that you’ve never read The Milagro Beanfield War or Bless Me Ultima or at least one Tony Hillerman book. (I finished Bless Me Ultima a month or so ago, by the way.)

Once you get to Part 2…a little shy of a hundred pages in…things start to pick up. The actual story starts to progress and there’s some action that creates and builds the tension. There are still a lot of characters and backstory thrown in, but you can start to see more clearly how those contribute to the story. The primary characters also start to feel more real and personal. You’ve reached the part of the relationship where the two of you are getting closer. You share more personal information with each other. You start to understand how all that info about friends, family, and past life reveal to you more of who your potential partner really is. You become more comfortable with the physical aspects of your relationship…the touches, caresses, and kisses.

As the story progresses through subsequent Parts, the humor of the beginning subsides and the tension builds through actions and deeper character development. There are two or three very moving reflective sections related to specific characters. At this point, it was hard for me to put the book down. In your relationship, you want to spend as much time as possible in the presence of the other person. The sexual tension is building and you’re eagerly and enthusiastically looking forward to your first night together.

The tension of the story builds like a wave to the crisis point, but It never crests. It just resolves itself almost pathetically and washes up harmlessly on the shore. There’s follow-up to it, but nothing very satisfying as far as bringing any kind of closure to the story. You’ve had sex with the person you thought might be “the one,” but it was just sex. It didn’t bring you the closeness and soul-completing oneness you thought it would. You stay for the rest of the night because it’s kind of expected. You get together a few more times but you both realize things won’t work out because something undefinable is missing. When your friends ask how the relationship is going, you find it difficult to admit to them that, in the end, there was just no spark there
that their hopes for you happiness have gone unmet.

I may at some point try another John Nichols book. He himself didn’t think The Milagro Beanfield War was his most profound work. If there’s enough of an ember left somewhere down the line, maybe I’ll try one of the two or three that he felt were the best reflections of what he strove to do with his writing. Que Viva Snuffy Ledoux!

I read this book 35 years ago for the first time when I was fifteen years old. It remains one of my all time favorites. After re-reading - because one of my friends told me I reminded him of Amarante Cordova - and because I always considered myself to be more of a Jose Mondragon - the themes remain contemporary. They remind me why I consider this timeless piece of literature to be such a great demonstration of artistry and craftsmanship.

Milagro Beanfield War is an enchanting story, told by a man who has a deep and abiding respect for the people he wrote about. His descriptions of the colorful characters and the beautiful landscapes reveal a man who is faithful to describing northern New Mexico Latino culture with clarity and sensitivity to all their quirky nuances.

Nichols reminds me why I love the northern part of the state so much. The rugged terrain is as breath-taking beautiful as its hard-scrabble inhabitants. I am convinced their vibrant culture and world view has been shaped by the land in which they live. Their ingenuity and tenacity are not as caricatured as you might be given to conclude according to Nichols' descriptions. Their bravado, sense of pride, chutzpah are not an exaggeration at all. Moreover, extraordinary things do happen up there and what is even more unusual is that is is not seen as anything out of the ordinary at all. Nichols does such a fantastic job of describing the terrain that he reminds me why I love Northern New Mexico - Taos in particular - so much.

Plainly put, this story is entertaining, comical and it sheds light on yet another group of Americans whose peculiarities spice up an already delicious story.

I felt a connection to all of the characters. However, if pressed to choose one, I believe my favorite would be the immortal Amarante Cordova who buys bullets for his antique .45 with food stamps.

Aside from Pacheco's huge, white pet pig that continually escapes and wreaks havoc in Milagro, the cast of characters include;

Joe Mondragon, the sawed-off banty rooster. The protagonist who unwittingly starts the war when he decides to irrigate his little bean field - of course the symbolism should not be wasted here as beans cause gas and Joe's little field caused a big stink.

Bernabe Montoya, the tired though politically astute sheriff whose comic-tragic life is measured by making mountains out of mole hills and mole hills out of mountains,

Seferino Pacheco, the illiterate old man who can nonchalantly critique Steinbeck, Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Juan Ramon Jimenez, Platero, Asturias, Garcia Lorca and Pablo Neruda but spends the lions' share of his time haplessly chasing down his wayward, errant pet pig,

Onofre Martinez, the one armed enigma who lost his arm to a fleet of butterflies and whose claim to shame is marked by having a son become a state police officer,

Charlie Bloom, the Harvard Lawyer cum honorary Chicano and publisher of a little news paper called 'The Voice of the People,'

A host of bad guys led by the evil, Ladd Devine III, an equally pugnacious, little white man whose size belies his ambitions, and

the women of Milagro who range from a pebble-tossing granny to loyal, devoted and equally nutty, delightfully powerful women.

These characters represent the tapestry of Milagros' comedic bravado and cloaked angst with its temperaments and dispositions.

I have read that some people do not like Nichols' depiction of the dominant culture and actually take exception to what has been described as the 'white man's burden.' Such detractors are really missing the point because the story is about a nostalgic look at a culture and way of life that is quickly waning. As a case in point, Onofre Martinez articulates the point quite eloquently (p 150)when someone makes an off handed comment about gringos;

'Wait a minute!' Onofre Martinez stammered excitedly, emotionally placing his hand on Ray Gusdorf's shoulder, 'This is my neighbor, and he is a gringo, not even a little bit coyote [half-breed:]. But he's been in the valley as long as I remember, and I consider him to be of my people. And that white man over there told us these things about the dam and the conservancy and showed us the maps, I consider him of my people too, even though he is a lawyer, even though he speaks funny Anglo Spanish you can hardly understand. But I believe he at least tries to speak the truth,and a lawyer who does that should get a big gold medal to hang around his neck. I don't consider Nick Rael to be of my people because he works against my interests
So, I don't believe this is a brown against white question. This is a only one kind of people against another kind of people with different ideas. There are brown people and white people on both sides
People are people
The brown people and white people on our side are better people because they are on the correct side, that's all


While many of the antiheroes in this story happen to be Anglo and the protagonists are mostly Latinos, the story would not change if the protagonists happened to be a group of backwater whites who were facing similar circumstances. Consequently, I don't really understand why someone, anyone would get ruffled about a white author writing about bad white guys. Apparently, Lonesome Dove doesn't evoke the same sort of bristled criticisms and, for that reason, I find the attacks on John Nichols unwarranted.

John Nichols has created a masterpiece, attentively woven with its muted colors of incredulity, tempered fatalism and brilliant splashes of hope.

I sincerely hope his magnum opus is not discounted because he has the temerity to celebrate the true essence of what is unique about being an American; diversity.

Finally, If you like magical realism, this book is perfect for you.

ps: There's nothing wrong with being like Amarante Cordova - although I still consider myself more like Joe Mondragon. And, hey Tony! You are crazier that Pacheco's pig! I was really enjoying this book for the first couple hundred pages, especially since I grew up watching the film and so I already had a huge affection for the story and the main characters. However, somewhere around page 300 I couldn't take it anymore. I don't know why everybody who pops into a scene has to have a lengthy backstory. It contributes nothing to my appreciation of a novel when the author digresses for five pages every time a new character, however insignificant, wanders onto the page. In the middle of the book absolutely nothing happens. The story doesn't move forward, the conversations about what to do or not to do about Joe's beanfield become repetitive, and rather than using this time to tell us more about the people we've already met, new people are introduced and given their five-page bios. Then everybody starts to look like a caricature, because they've each been allotted their several traits, their behavior in each situation is 100% anticipatable, and none of them seems imbued with the capacity to change. I don't find characters who have no progression very interesting, and that's all I found in this book. They work pretty well in a 2 hour movie, but I have less patience for them in a 630-page book. I wish John Nichols and his editors had realized that he had a damn good 200-page book on his hands. I don't understand why so much of the reading public has a high tolerance for authorial blather. But then, I'm a slow reader who enjoys reading slowly, taking my time to absorb the craft of great writing. Or, conversely, I can appreciate a book short on literary craft but well paced and devoted to telling a good yarn. You had a great yarn, Nichols. I'm happy that some moviemakers found it and extracted it from this overwrought and overwritten book. I remember this book more than I do many others, so it must have left an impression My friend Cathy and I went to Santa Fe and found that Robert Redford was filming this movie. So we decided to go watch them film. We got to the gate and I lied by saying that we were with the press, but then Cathy had to go and tell the truth. So, we didn't get in to see him. That night we were at a bar in Santa Fe and ran into the crew, and one of their members said that we could come to watch them film the next day. But alas, we were leaving town in the morning. The book and the movie were good, but not great, and this isn't about sour grapes. In a New Mexico valley the power is held by one man and his company. Over the years Ladd Devine’s family has manipulated the indigenous peasant farmers, securing the majority of water rights for his proposed golf course / spa retreat while leaving the original residents with arid land, unsuitable for farming, or even grazing. So he’s been able to buy out the poor farmers securing more and more land and leaving less water for those that remain. Until one day Joe Mondragon decides to cut a break in the wall and divert water onto his late father’s field, so he can plant some beans.

I've had this book on my TBR radar for a bajillion years and I don't know why I waited so long to read it. I really liked it a lot! The quirky characters, the message, the humor, the pathos, and the landscape all made this an especially moving book for me. I could not help but think of my grandparents - we always referred to their property as a dirt farm - dirt being their most reliable crop. They were on their ranch / farm well into their 80s
even after my grandfather had two strokes. He just got up and kept caring for the animals, tending the orchards, repairing the truck, doing whatever it took to keep on living.

So thank you, PBT Trim the TBR for finally giving me the push I needed to get to this gem of a novel. I can hardly wait to read it again!

If I have any complaint about the book, it’s about this edition’s AFTERWARD, where the author begins with: Actually, I’ve sort of had it with THE MILAGRO BEANFIELD WAR. and goes on to explain how distressed he is that this is the only book people seem to remember him for rather all his other works, some of which he believes are superior. But my disappointment with his little tantrum doesn’t diminish my enjoyment of the book itself.
I'm always sad when I decide to give up on a book. It feels like euthanasia. But sometimes I have to grit my teeth and put the book down. This was one of those cases.

I wanted to love The Milagro Beanfield War because of its quirkiness, but the sheer number of characters and amount of back story was overwhelming. I appreciate Nichols taking the time to create an entire town full of people, past and present, but he didn't need to include every single one of them in his final draft. At first it was cute. By the time I was closing in on page 100, it was just exhausting.

Rest in peace, people of Milagro. Great read and funny as heck. Points out that water is the life blood of the west. I think I met Joe Mondragon or his twin. I think I want to visit New Mexico. Whew! That was a long one! One of those massive, epic-style novels that we used to see so much of in the 1970s and 1980s. I feel like I've been living in the fictional town of Milagro, New Mexico for the last month - the time it has taken me to finish this!

I visited New Mexico last summer and loved everything about it! This author did such a great job with setting that I was immediately transported back through his vivid descriptions. I also loved the quirky, multi-layered characters of the town. Powerful storyline, too - kept it moving.

The only reason I gave it 4 instead of 5 stars is that there were just TOO MANY of those quirky, multi-layered characters! There were about 65 names mentioned and seriously, about 30 that the reader had to really remember because they were part of all the events and plot action. It was totally unnecessary, and the author's editor should have jumped on that right away. Delete, delete, delete.

I suppose the last thing to mention is that it was pretty political. Little farmer guy good vs. big corporate guy bad. I thought there was balance and that it was portrayed fairly, and I didn't think it was too heavy-handed for either side, though I've heard people argue that it was. You read and decide! I thoroughly enjoyed it and would like to see the movie now.

The Milagro Beanfield War MOBI ↠ The Milagro  PDF \
    EPUB is an ebook file format that uses the epub War et des millions de livres en stock surAchetez neuf ou d occasionThe Milagro The Milagro PDF \ Beanfield War Livres NotRetrouvez The Milagro Beanfield War et des millions de livres en stock surAchetez neuf ou d occasion Milagro film WikipdiaThe Milagro Beanfield War FULL MOVIEWatch The Milagro Beanfield War Full Movie IN HD Visit Tlcharger In Milagro, The Milagro Beanfield War Water and Society Theatrical Trailer for The Milagro Beanfield WarCourtesy of Universal Movies Film Analysis by Kamie Powell InJohn Nichol published a novel titled The Milagro Beanfield War, a comical yet heartfelt tale of one town s resistance against a big business with political backing Fourteen years later, director Robert Redford transformed Nichol s classic tale into an inferior film Watch The Milagro Beanfield War Prime Video The Milagro Beanfield War is the best movie ever It s better than your favorite movie Old man Amarante is the best character ever He has a Peacekeeper he can drive a tractor and hangs out with an Angel Adapted by John Nichols from his book haven t read it , it was made in the late s don t remember them , a great period for filmmaking by a few accounts It has the nicest copThe Milagro Beanfield War WikipediaThe Milagro Beanfield War DVD for sale online eBay The Milagro Beanfield War movie is a delightful adaptation of the book of the same name The movie is able to communicate the resentment that many Native New Mexicans have of the outsiders who come to our state and try to change the way things have been for hundreds of years Joe Mondragon s use of our most valuable resource water by irrigating his ancestral farm raises an uproar of Carlos Riquelme Roberto Carricart Milagro Vintage The Milagro Beanfield War Actors Actress Glossy Press Photo shippingPress Photo Gov Mrs Roberto Sanchez Vilella, Puerto Rico in Washington shippingPress Photo Father Roberto Pirrone s model of ocean liner Titanic displayed shippingPhoto Actor The Milagro Beanfield War Carlos Riquel Me As Amarante X. This is my favorite damn book of all time ever. If you don't like it, I'm liable to punch you in the genitals.

    Ostensibly, the book is about a water-rights squabble in a small town in New Mexico. But the book is so much more: the differences between the Mexican and American cultures, believing in miracles, political dissidence, and all of the ridiculously awesome characters that the author breathes life into.

    There's Amarante Cordova, the ageless wonder who has been dying since birth, only to outlive many of his own children; there's one-armed Onofre Martinez, who claims that he lost his appendage to a butterfly; pugnacious Joe Mondragon, the pint sized protagonist who starts the whole squabble; Milo, his guilt ridden lawyer who has to reconcile his white American background with his Hispanic wife; Horsethief Shorty, the foreman at the Dancing Trout ranch and crony to main villain Ladd Devine III; and a whole assortment of special agents, water rights lawyers, body shop and plumbing shop owners, angels and car thieving senile grandmothers.

    The book unfolds in a blissfully organic, sprawling way. You'll follow different characters in different chapters, as they all deal with their own trials and tribulations, usually working at cross purposes with other characters. Things build to a climax involving the whole host of characters, and for a change in a town called Miracle, the good guys win one. I know The Milagro Beanfield War is a cult classic, but based on a cursory perusal of the reviews, I’d say it’s a book that you either love or don’t. I won’t say you love it or hate it because I found very little actual animosity toward it in the negative reviews. Those readers just couldn’t seem to get into the book.

    My feelings about the book are somewhere between the love and don’t love ends of the spectrum. For me, reading it was like an unsatisfying/unsuccessful romantic endeavor. Part 1 of the book was a bit tedious and confusing with the introduction of so many characters and backstory. Kind of like when you first start getting to know someone with whom you have an inclination to become romantically involved. You get a lot of information about the person’s family, friends, and past life, but most of it just sails past you because you want to know about the person rather than all the peripheral stuff. I came close to giving up on the book at this stage. The main reason I didn’t is because when you grew up in New Mexico and currently live here, it’s hard to admit that you’ve never read The Milagro Beanfield War or Bless Me Ultima or at least one Tony Hillerman book. (I finished Bless Me Ultima a month or so ago, by the way.)

    Once you get to Part 2…a little shy of a hundred pages in…things start to pick up. The actual story starts to progress and there’s some action that creates and builds the tension. There are still a lot of characters and backstory thrown in, but you can start to see more clearly how those contribute to the story. The primary characters also start to feel more real and personal. You’ve reached the part of the relationship where the two of you are getting closer. You share more personal information with each other. You start to understand how all that info about friends, family, and past life reveal to you more of who your potential partner really is. You become more comfortable with the physical aspects of your relationship…the touches, caresses, and kisses.

    As the story progresses through subsequent Parts, the humor of the beginning subsides and the tension builds through actions and deeper character development. There are two or three very moving reflective sections related to specific characters. At this point, it was hard for me to put the book down. In your relationship, you want to spend as much time as possible in the presence of the other person. The sexual tension is building and you’re eagerly and enthusiastically looking forward to your first night together.

    The tension of the story builds like a wave to the crisis point, but It never crests. It just resolves itself almost pathetically and washes up harmlessly on the shore. There’s follow-up to it, but nothing very satisfying as far as bringing any kind of closure to the story. You’ve had sex with the person you thought might be “the one,” but it was just sex. It didn’t bring you the closeness and soul-completing oneness you thought it would. You stay for the rest of the night because it’s kind of expected. You get together a few more times but you both realize things won’t work out because something undefinable is missing. When your friends ask how the relationship is going, you find it difficult to admit to them that, in the end, there was just no spark there
    that their hopes for you happiness have gone unmet.

    I may at some point try another John Nichols book. He himself didn’t think The Milagro Beanfield War was his most profound work. If there’s enough of an ember left somewhere down the line, maybe I’ll try one of the two or three that he felt were the best reflections of what he strove to do with his writing. Que Viva Snuffy Ledoux!

    I read this book 35 years ago for the first time when I was fifteen years old. It remains one of my all time favorites. After re-reading - because one of my friends told me I reminded him of Amarante Cordova - and because I always considered myself to be more of a Jose Mondragon - the themes remain contemporary. They remind me why I consider this timeless piece of literature to be such a great demonstration of artistry and craftsmanship.

    Milagro Beanfield War is an enchanting story, told by a man who has a deep and abiding respect for the people he wrote about. His descriptions of the colorful characters and the beautiful landscapes reveal a man who is faithful to describing northern New Mexico Latino culture with clarity and sensitivity to all their quirky nuances.

    Nichols reminds me why I love the northern part of the state so much. The rugged terrain is as breath-taking beautiful as its hard-scrabble inhabitants. I am convinced their vibrant culture and world view has been shaped by the land in which they live. Their ingenuity and tenacity are not as caricatured as you might be given to conclude according to Nichols' descriptions. Their bravado, sense of pride, chutzpah are not an exaggeration at all. Moreover, extraordinary things do happen up there and what is even more unusual is that is is not seen as anything out of the ordinary at all. Nichols does such a fantastic job of describing the terrain that he reminds me why I love Northern New Mexico - Taos in particular - so much.

    Plainly put, this story is entertaining, comical and it sheds light on yet another group of Americans whose peculiarities spice up an already delicious story.

    I felt a connection to all of the characters. However, if pressed to choose one, I believe my favorite would be the immortal Amarante Cordova who buys bullets for his antique .45 with food stamps.

    Aside from Pacheco's huge, white pet pig that continually escapes and wreaks havoc in Milagro, the cast of characters include;

    Joe Mondragon, the sawed-off banty rooster. The protagonist who unwittingly starts the war when he decides to irrigate his little bean field - of course the symbolism should not be wasted here as beans cause gas and Joe's little field caused a big stink.

    Bernabe Montoya, the tired though politically astute sheriff whose comic-tragic life is measured by making mountains out of mole hills and mole hills out of mountains,

    Seferino Pacheco, the illiterate old man who can nonchalantly critique Steinbeck, Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Juan Ramon Jimenez, Platero, Asturias, Garcia Lorca and Pablo Neruda but spends the lions' share of his time haplessly chasing down his wayward, errant pet pig,

    Onofre Martinez, the one armed enigma who lost his arm to a fleet of butterflies and whose claim to shame is marked by having a son become a state police officer,

    Charlie Bloom, the Harvard Lawyer cum honorary Chicano and publisher of a little news paper called 'The Voice of the People,'

    A host of bad guys led by the evil, Ladd Devine III, an equally pugnacious, little white man whose size belies his ambitions, and

    the women of Milagro who range from a pebble-tossing granny to loyal, devoted and equally nutty, delightfully powerful women.

    These characters represent the tapestry of Milagros' comedic bravado and cloaked angst with its temperaments and dispositions.

    I have read that some people do not like Nichols' depiction of the dominant culture and actually take exception to what has been described as the 'white man's burden.' Such detractors are really missing the point because the story is about a nostalgic look at a culture and way of life that is quickly waning. As a case in point, Onofre Martinez articulates the point quite eloquently (p 150)when someone makes an off handed comment about gringos;

    'Wait a minute!' Onofre Martinez stammered excitedly, emotionally placing his hand on Ray Gusdorf's shoulder, 'This is my neighbor, and he is a gringo, not even a little bit coyote [half-breed:]. But he's been in the valley as long as I remember, and I consider him to be of my people. And that white man over there told us these things about the dam and the conservancy and showed us the maps, I consider him of my people too, even though he is a lawyer, even though he speaks funny Anglo Spanish you can hardly understand. But I believe he at least tries to speak the truth,and a lawyer who does that should get a big gold medal to hang around his neck. I don't consider Nick Rael to be of my people because he works against my interests
    So, I don't believe this is a brown against white question. This is a only one kind of people against another kind of people with different ideas. There are brown people and white people on both sides
    People are people
    The brown people and white people on our side are better people because they are on the correct side, that's all


    While many of the antiheroes in this story happen to be Anglo and the protagonists are mostly Latinos, the story would not change if the protagonists happened to be a group of backwater whites who were facing similar circumstances. Consequently, I don't really understand why someone, anyone would get ruffled about a white author writing about bad white guys. Apparently, Lonesome Dove doesn't evoke the same sort of bristled criticisms and, for that reason, I find the attacks on John Nichols unwarranted.

    John Nichols has created a masterpiece, attentively woven with its muted colors of incredulity, tempered fatalism and brilliant splashes of hope.

    I sincerely hope his magnum opus is not discounted because he has the temerity to celebrate the true essence of what is unique about being an American; diversity.

    Finally, If you like magical realism, this book is perfect for you.

    ps: There's nothing wrong with being like Amarante Cordova - although I still consider myself more like Joe Mondragon. And, hey Tony! You are crazier that Pacheco's pig! I was really enjoying this book for the first couple hundred pages, especially since I grew up watching the film and so I already had a huge affection for the story and the main characters. However, somewhere around page 300 I couldn't take it anymore. I don't know why everybody who pops into a scene has to have a lengthy backstory. It contributes nothing to my appreciation of a novel when the author digresses for five pages every time a new character, however insignificant, wanders onto the page. In the middle of the book absolutely nothing happens. The story doesn't move forward, the conversations about what to do or not to do about Joe's beanfield become repetitive, and rather than using this time to tell us more about the people we've already met, new people are introduced and given their five-page bios. Then everybody starts to look like a caricature, because they've each been allotted their several traits, their behavior in each situation is 100% anticipatable, and none of them seems imbued with the capacity to change. I don't find characters who have no progression very interesting, and that's all I found in this book. They work pretty well in a 2 hour movie, but I have less patience for them in a 630-page book. I wish John Nichols and his editors had realized that he had a damn good 200-page book on his hands. I don't understand why so much of the reading public has a high tolerance for authorial blather. But then, I'm a slow reader who enjoys reading slowly, taking my time to absorb the craft of great writing. Or, conversely, I can appreciate a book short on literary craft but well paced and devoted to telling a good yarn. You had a great yarn, Nichols. I'm happy that some moviemakers found it and extracted it from this overwrought and overwritten book. I remember this book more than I do many others, so it must have left an impression My friend Cathy and I went to Santa Fe and found that Robert Redford was filming this movie. So we decided to go watch them film. We got to the gate and I lied by saying that we were with the press, but then Cathy had to go and tell the truth. So, we didn't get in to see him. That night we were at a bar in Santa Fe and ran into the crew, and one of their members said that we could come to watch them film the next day. But alas, we were leaving town in the morning. The book and the movie were good, but not great, and this isn't about sour grapes. In a New Mexico valley the power is held by one man and his company. Over the years Ladd Devine’s family has manipulated the indigenous peasant farmers, securing the majority of water rights for his proposed golf course / spa retreat while leaving the original residents with arid land, unsuitable for farming, or even grazing. So he’s been able to buy out the poor farmers securing more and more land and leaving less water for those that remain. Until one day Joe Mondragon decides to cut a break in the wall and divert water onto his late father’s field, so he can plant some beans.

    I've had this book on my TBR radar for a bajillion years and I don't know why I waited so long to read it. I really liked it a lot! The quirky characters, the message, the humor, the pathos, and the landscape all made this an especially moving book for me. I could not help but think of my grandparents - we always referred to their property as a dirt farm - dirt being their most reliable crop. They were on their ranch / farm well into their 80s
    even after my grandfather had two strokes. He just got up and kept caring for the animals, tending the orchards, repairing the truck, doing whatever it took to keep on living.

    So thank you, PBT Trim the TBR for finally giving me the push I needed to get to this gem of a novel. I can hardly wait to read it again!

    If I have any complaint about the book, it’s about this edition’s AFTERWARD, where the author begins with: Actually, I’ve sort of had it with THE MILAGRO BEANFIELD WAR. and goes on to explain how distressed he is that this is the only book people seem to remember him for rather all his other works, some of which he believes are superior. But my disappointment with his little tantrum doesn’t diminish my enjoyment of the book itself.
    I'm always sad when I decide to give up on a book. It feels like euthanasia. But sometimes I have to grit my teeth and put the book down. This was one of those cases.

    I wanted to love The Milagro Beanfield War because of its quirkiness, but the sheer number of characters and amount of back story was overwhelming. I appreciate Nichols taking the time to create an entire town full of people, past and present, but he didn't need to include every single one of them in his final draft. At first it was cute. By the time I was closing in on page 100, it was just exhausting.

    Rest in peace, people of Milagro. Great read and funny as heck. Points out that water is the life blood of the west. I think I met Joe Mondragon or his twin. I think I want to visit New Mexico. Whew! That was a long one! One of those massive, epic-style novels that we used to see so much of in the 1970s and 1980s. I feel like I've been living in the fictional town of Milagro, New Mexico for the last month - the time it has taken me to finish this!

    I visited New Mexico last summer and loved everything about it! This author did such a great job with setting that I was immediately transported back through his vivid descriptions. I also loved the quirky, multi-layered characters of the town. Powerful storyline, too - kept it moving.

    The only reason I gave it 4 instead of 5 stars is that there were just TOO MANY of those quirky, multi-layered characters! There were about 65 names mentioned and seriously, about 30 that the reader had to really remember because they were part of all the events and plot action. It was totally unnecessary, and the author's editor should have jumped on that right away. Delete, delete, delete.

    I suppose the last thing to mention is that it was pretty political. Little farmer guy good vs. big corporate guy bad. I thought there was balance and that it was portrayed fairly, and I didn't think it was too heavy-handed for either side, though I've heard people argue that it was. You read and decide! I thoroughly enjoyed it and would like to see the movie now. "/>
  • Paperback
  • 456 pages
  • The Milagro Beanfield War
  • John Nichols
  • English
  • 05 August 2018
  • 9780805063745