Gaia: A New Look at Life on Earth

Gaia: A New Look at Life on Earth❰Read❯ ➫ Gaia: A New Look at Life on Earth Author James E. Lovelock – Jobs-in-kingston.co.uk In this classic work that continues to inspire its many readers, James Lovelock deftly explains his idea that life on earth functions as a single organism Written for the non scientist, Gaia is a jour New Look PDF Ç In this classic work that continues to inspire its many readers, James Lovelock deftly explains his idea that life on earth functions as a single organism Written for the non scientist, Gaia is a journey through time and space in search of evidence with which to support a new and radically different model of our planet In contrast to conventional belief that living matter is passive in the face of threats to its existence, the book explores the hypothesis that the earth s living matter air, ocean, and Gaia: A PDF or land surfaces forms a complex system that has the capacity to keep the Earth a fit place for life Since Gaia was first published, many of Jim Lovelock s predictions have come true, and his theory has become a hotly argued topic in scientific circles Here, in a new Preface, Lovelock outlines his present state of the debate. I decided to dust this book off which had been sitting on my bookshelf unread for 15 years My decision came after reading Richard Dawkin s book, The God Delusion Which renewed my interest in the looking at evolutionary processes Gaia A New Look at Life on Earth, is certainly an apt title, as Lovelock does have a fascinating perspective with which he paints our world His theory, the Gaia hypothesis may at first sound as if it has mystical connotations, but that is not the case, rather he i I decided to dust this book off which had been sitting on my bookshelf unread for 15 years My decision came after reading Richard Dawkin s book, The God Delusion Which renewed my interest in the looking at evolutionary processes Gaia A New Look at Life on Earth, is certainly an apt title, as Lovelock does have a fascinating perspective with which he paints our world His theory, the Gaia hypothesis may at first sound as if it has mystical connotations, but that is not the case, rather he is making a case that the world on which we live is acts as a huge living organism that regulates it s own temperature and tempers it s own body chemistry so as to be habitable to life In turn the life which inhabits this biosphere helps to carry out these processes.I have seen this in action, when I was studying soil science in college Well aerated soil uses the trapped oxygen to attract hydrogen molecules in water, thus creating a respiratory system that moves nutrient bearing water through the soil and even creating a soil metabolism that can warm or cool the soil in reaction to the ambient air temperature Often times the intervention of animals helps to aerate the soil, so a symbiosis occurs between the soil and other living organisms It is these kinds of things which Lovelock calls Gaian interactions.As exciting to me as these circular systems are, Lovelock himself is not a particularly gripping author He is very much a scientist of a certain age He earned his science chops in the era right after WWII when sciences had a certain rock star quality, an scientists could be very arrogant, which Lovelock suffers from to a small degree Having said that his observations about the planet were groundbreaking for their time and his Gaian perspective of an organism that has been going strong for 3 Aeons with or without humans is very humbling So I would recommend this book with the caveat that the prose is not easy to follow at times, but the ideas about planetary biology are compelling enough to make it worth soldiering through Lovelock We can t save the planet Tuesday, 30 March 2010 11 08 UK Professor James Lovelock, the scientist who developed Gaia theory, has said it is too late to try and save the planet The man who achieved global fame for his theory that the whole earth is a single organism now believes that we can only hope that the earth will take care of itself in the face of completely unpredictable climate change.At the age of 90, Prof Lovelock is resigned to his own fate and the fate of the planet Whe Lovelock We can t save the planet Tuesday, 30 March 2010 11 08 UK Professor James Lovelock, the scientist who developed Gaia theory, has said it is too late to try and save the planet The man who achieved global fame for his theory that the whole earth is a single organism now believes that we can only hope that the earth will take care of itself in the face of completely unpredictable climate change.At the age of 90, Prof Lovelock is resigned to his own fate and the fate of the planet Whether the planet saves itself or not, he argues, all we can do is to enjoy life while you can Trying to save the planet is a lot of nonsense.31.05.2017 Further proof that a book doesn t have to be good to be great I read this because of my interest in science friendly earth religion In my other readings, and even in private meditations, I keep coming back to Gaia theory But I didn t really understand what that theory entails It s often described in a nutshell thusly The Earth can be considered as a single organism But what does that mean, really What does that nutshell contain This book has the answer Or at least, the start of an answ Further proof that a book doesn t have to be good to be great I read this because of my interest in science friendly earth religion In my other readings, and even in private meditations, I keep coming back to Gaia theory But I didn t really understand what that theory entails It s often described in a nutshell thusly The Earth can be considered as a single organism But what does that mean, really What does that nutshell contain This book has the answer Or at least, the start of an answer It s seminal stuff I believe this book, written in 1979, is the first popular articulation of Gaia theory It s required reading for an interested novice like myself.It may be a popular treatment, but that doesn t mean it s pablum In fact, I found the technical details a bit tedious at times I m not a scientist mostly I read novels Fortunately the whole book s rather brief I found Lovelock s philosophical musings acompelling read The epilogue is especially thought provoking, though it seems to go off the rails in the final paragraphs, with a diatribe against whale hunting Still and all, this book transformed my basic understanding of Gaia theory I feel like I get the basic idea now It s much subtler and yet, seemingly,logical androbust than I d anticipated I recommend this book to anyone interested in the topic, with the above caveats When I ve heard of the Gaia theory before, I ve usually heard of it in a sceptical sort of context that criticises the tree hugging idea that Earth has a soul That is not actually the main thrust of Lovelock s argument at all instead, what he argues is that Gaia, or Earth, is a self sustaining system with in built feedback loops which hold itor less steady and capable of supporting life.If you ve studied climate or geology or even the water cycle, you know that he s not wrong about the s When I ve heard of the Gaia theory before, I ve usually heard of it in a sceptical sort of context that criticises the tree hugging idea that Earth has a soul That is not actually the main thrust of Lovelock s argument at all instead, what he argues is that Gaia, or Earth, is a self sustaining system with in built feedback loops which hold itor less steady and capable of supporting life.If you ve studied climate or geology or even the water cycle, you know that he s not wrong about the self sustaining system There s so many negative feedback loops which keep things in check some of which are, of course, threatening to be sabotaged by the action of one particular upstart mammal species with delusions of grandeur We re a part of the system, of course, but one which may have got out of hand Or maybe not maybe our intelligence will help rein us back in We can only hope.The point is, Lovelock s not saying anything about a cosy loving Earth Mother spirit watching over us Though his language in this book is sometimes poetical, and his sense of wonder at nature is clear, he s talking about self regulating, self sustaining systems He s talking about the fact that the world has checks and balances in place which bring Earth into equilibrium, even though other factors like the sun s energy output have changed over time And okay, at some points he goes off on a tangent about whale intelligence and a hypothetical future in which whale brains give us technological advances, but the science here isn t wrong.There s nothing actually revolutionary or tree hugging here It s just true Call it Gaia or call it a complex set of feedback loops whatever you re comfortable with, I guess I do wish I d read Revenge of Gaia instead, since this is horribly optimistic that humans will pull our collective fingers out and stop damaging the planet I suspect Lovelock s less sanguine about that prospect now.Originally reviewed for breathesbooks.com In Gaia, first published in 1979, Lovelock describes the planet and all living things on it as a self regulating entity, much like a collection of cells, organs, and bacteria together produce a living entity that we might think of as a person My favorite thing about Gaia theory is that I paradoxically intuit that it s obviously ridiculous but also that it s obviously correct.Readers new to this theory and book might do well to start in two places outside the introduction In the epilogue, Lovel In Gaia, first published in 1979, Lovelock describes the planet and all living things on it as a self regulating entity, much like a collection of cells, organs, and bacteria together produce a living entity that we might think of as a person My favorite thing about Gaia theory is that I paradoxically intuit that it s obviously ridiculous but also that it s obviously correct.Readers new to this theory and book might do well to start in two places outside the introduction In the epilogue, Lovelock explains that the Gaia Hypothesis postulates that the physical and chemical condition of surface of the Earth, of the atmosphere, and of the oceans has been and is actively made fit and comfortable by the presence of life itself This is in contrast to the conventional wisdom which held that life adapted to the planetary conditions as it and they evolved their separate ways This last distinction is useful to keep in mind when reading the other chapters, which at first glance seem needlessly wonky I also found the chapter on cybernetics a useful foundation for understanding Gaia Lovelock defines cybernetics as self regulating systems of communication and control in living organisms and machines Put this way, it does seem obvious that the planet should be understood as one massive web of interconnected systems.How should we think about humanity within this Gaia framework Lovelock considers two ecological views Ren Dubos has powerfully expressed the concept of man as the steward to life on Earth, in symbiosis with it like some grand gardener for all the world It is a hopeful, optimistic view and a liberal one In contrast to Dubos, Garrett Hardin apparently sees man as acting out a great tragedy which may lead not only to his own destruction but to the that of the whole world He suggests that our only means of escape is to renounce most of our technology, especially nuclear energy, but he seems to doubt whether we have free choice Lovelock, however, isinclined in this work to decrease human exceptionalism, which would counter the grandeur of Dubos view People are just another planetary entity He is alsooptimistic about technology than Hardin and would go on to defend nuclear energy in his later life which has extended to 100 years as I write this review.It s maybe worth noting that Lovelock is optimistic about humanity s use of technology in relation to the environment because people listen so carefully to journalists and act to mitigate their impact He writes that the rapid dissemination of information about the environment helps to reduce the time constant of our response to adverse changes Given how often today s political elites ignore or dismiss both scholars and the press, and given how much online media now seems undermined by misinformation troll and bot armies, we might laugh at this optimism But for Lovelock, it must have seemed sensible when seeing how readily the liberal democracies responded to Rachel Carson s Silent Spring and to Crutzen s work on the ozone layer the Montreal Protocol was passed within ten years At one point, he criticizes environmentalists for underestimating their impact in producing countervailing responses to their concerns, but he foresaw no backlash against environmentalism, the academy, or journalism Nathaniel Rich s Losing Earth The Decade We Almost Stopped Climate Change might be a useful counter to Lovelock s implicit prediction here Random Notes I was surprised by how often I recognized the scholars and scientific history here As noted, Carson Silent Spring, Crutzen Anthropocene , Dubos think globally, act locally , and Hardin The Tragedy of the Commons appear Lyn Margulis helps to write and develop the hypothesis and its ideas are first published in her ex husband Carl Sagan s journal Milutin Milankovi is mentioned Richard Dawkins skepticism of the Gaia hypothesis is mentioned in the introduction of the edition I read William Golding, who wrote Lord of the Flies, suggests using Gaia to name the theory Arthur C Clarke is quoted Lovelock begins thinking about how to recognize life while helping NASA to create probes to study the possibility of life on Mars The scientists at this time can remember working on what gases most likely warmed the planet in the distant past, not ammonia but carbon dioxide And they are still working out the atmospheric role of aerosols even if they have already figured out that CFCs are harmful to the ozone layer A final note in spite of Lovelock s at least tangential connection to Carl Sagan, he always writes 1000 million rather than a billion As an ecologist and all round nature lover I am rather familiar with Lovelock s Gaia concept, one that I have not been wholly convinced by And this book has done nothing to help that While I do like the idea of nature being an actual single entity being organism deliberately managing the planet for the benefit of all species, this is a belief and not something that can or should be applied to science or visa versa for that matter Lovelock s explanations of many of the basic Earth systems we As an ecologist and all round nature lover I am rather familiar with Lovelock s Gaia concept, one that I have not been wholly convinced by And this book has done nothing to help that While I do like the idea of nature being an actual single entity being organism deliberately managing the planet for the benefit of all species, this is a belief and not something that can or should be applied to science or visa versa for that matter Lovelock s explanations of many of the basic Earth systems were good, relatively easy to read and accompanied by useful examples relating them to processes systems that those without a lot of environmental knowledge can understand And for this I commend him However the way he fit these together to provide evidence for his Gaia hypothesis came across forced and comparable to some of the arguments put forward by the Creationists, although they are somewhatlogicalbut only just For me this is not a scientific theory but a belief idea that has its basis in the religions of old, Wiccan being a good example Disagree with Gaia Hypothesis did not means this book is bad written Lovelock gave me insight about how to use chemistry and thermodynamics as analytical tool. This book was challenging for me due to the high focus on the chemical processes of the earth and atmosphere I was hoping this focus would drop off after the first few chapters, but Lovelock continues it throughout the book However, I don t think this will present a problem to those studied in chemistry on a basic level The hypothesis seemed a little outdated to me as I think the thought of the earth being one large living organism has pretty much seeped into most of our understanding by now This book was challenging for me due to the high focus on the chemical processes of the earth and atmosphere I was hoping this focus would drop off after the first few chapters, but Lovelock continues it throughout the book However, I don t think this will present a problem to those studied in chemistry on a basic level The hypothesis seemed a little outdated to me as I think the thought of the earth being one large living organism has pretty much seeped into most of our understanding by now I did, however, especially enjoy the chapter on cybernetics One great, ingenious concept stretched out over a whole book By reading the introduction and the last chapter you have a whole summary of the purpose of the book and the ideas behind it The idea itself is truly fascinating and I think I have come to agree with Lovelock Love the concept, however the book gets very tedious and repetitive. Seminal Not at all what the treehuggers and New Agers think it is.

Gaia: A New Look at Life on Earth PDF/EPUB ↠ A New
    EPUB is an ebook file format that uses the epub of our planet In contrast to conventional belief that living matter is passive in the face of threats to its existence, the book explores the hypothesis that the earth s living matter air, ocean, and Gaia: A PDF or land surfaces forms a complex system that has the capacity to keep the Earth a fit place for life Since Gaia was first published, many of Jim Lovelock s predictions have come true, and his theory has become a hotly argued topic in scientific circles Here, in a new Preface, Lovelock outlines his present state of the debate. I decided to dust this book off which had been sitting on my bookshelf unread for 15 years My decision came after reading Richard Dawkin s book, The God Delusion Which renewed my interest in the looking at evolutionary processes Gaia A New Look at Life on Earth, is certainly an apt title, as Lovelock does have a fascinating perspective with which he paints our world His theory, the Gaia hypothesis may at first sound as if it has mystical connotations, but that is not the case, rather he i I decided to dust this book off which had been sitting on my bookshelf unread for 15 years My decision came after reading Richard Dawkin s book, The God Delusion Which renewed my interest in the looking at evolutionary processes Gaia A New Look at Life on Earth, is certainly an apt title, as Lovelock does have a fascinating perspective with which he paints our world His theory, the Gaia hypothesis may at first sound as if it has mystical connotations, but that is not the case, rather he is making a case that the world on which we live is acts as a huge living organism that regulates it s own temperature and tempers it s own body chemistry so as to be habitable to life In turn the life which inhabits this biosphere helps to carry out these processes.I have seen this in action, when I was studying soil science in college Well aerated soil uses the trapped oxygen to attract hydrogen molecules in water, thus creating a respiratory system that moves nutrient bearing water through the soil and even creating a soil metabolism that can warm or cool the soil in reaction to the ambient air temperature Often times the intervention of animals helps to aerate the soil, so a symbiosis occurs between the soil and other living organisms It is these kinds of things which Lovelock calls Gaian interactions.As exciting to me as these circular systems are, Lovelock himself is not a particularly gripping author He is very much a scientist of a certain age He earned his science chops in the era right after WWII when sciences had a certain rock star quality, an scientists could be very arrogant, which Lovelock suffers from to a small degree Having said that his observations about the planet were groundbreaking for their time and his Gaian perspective of an organism that has been going strong for 3 Aeons with or without humans is very humbling So I would recommend this book with the caveat that the prose is not easy to follow at times, but the ideas about planetary biology are compelling enough to make it worth soldiering through Lovelock We can t save the planet Tuesday, 30 March 2010 11 08 UK Professor James Lovelock, the scientist who developed Gaia theory, has said it is too late to try and save the planet The man who achieved global fame for his theory that the whole earth is a single organism now believes that we can only hope that the earth will take care of itself in the face of completely unpredictable climate change.At the age of 90, Prof Lovelock is resigned to his own fate and the fate of the planet Whe Lovelock We can t save the planet Tuesday, 30 March 2010 11 08 UK Professor James Lovelock, the scientist who developed Gaia theory, has said it is too late to try and save the planet The man who achieved global fame for his theory that the whole earth is a single organism now believes that we can only hope that the earth will take care of itself in the face of completely unpredictable climate change.At the age of 90, Prof Lovelock is resigned to his own fate and the fate of the planet Whether the planet saves itself or not, he argues, all we can do is to enjoy life while you can Trying to save the planet is a lot of nonsense.31.05.2017 Further proof that a book doesn t have to be good to be great I read this because of my interest in science friendly earth religion In my other readings, and even in private meditations, I keep coming back to Gaia theory But I didn t really understand what that theory entails It s often described in a nutshell thusly The Earth can be considered as a single organism But what does that mean, really What does that nutshell contain This book has the answer Or at least, the start of an answ Further proof that a book doesn t have to be good to be great I read this because of my interest in science friendly earth religion In my other readings, and even in private meditations, I keep coming back to Gaia theory But I didn t really understand what that theory entails It s often described in a nutshell thusly The Earth can be considered as a single organism But what does that mean, really What does that nutshell contain This book has the answer Or at least, the start of an answer It s seminal stuff I believe this book, written in 1979, is the first popular articulation of Gaia theory It s required reading for an interested novice like myself.It may be a popular treatment, but that doesn t mean it s pablum In fact, I found the technical details a bit tedious at times I m not a scientist mostly I read novels Fortunately the whole book s rather brief I found Lovelock s philosophical musings acompelling read The epilogue is especially thought provoking, though it seems to go off the rails in the final paragraphs, with a diatribe against whale hunting Still and all, this book transformed my basic understanding of Gaia theory I feel like I get the basic idea now It s much subtler and yet, seemingly,logical androbust than I d anticipated I recommend this book to anyone interested in the topic, with the above caveats When I ve heard of the Gaia theory before, I ve usually heard of it in a sceptical sort of context that criticises the tree hugging idea that Earth has a soul That is not actually the main thrust of Lovelock s argument at all instead, what he argues is that Gaia, or Earth, is a self sustaining system with in built feedback loops which hold itor less steady and capable of supporting life.If you ve studied climate or geology or even the water cycle, you know that he s not wrong about the s When I ve heard of the Gaia theory before, I ve usually heard of it in a sceptical sort of context that criticises the tree hugging idea that Earth has a soul That is not actually the main thrust of Lovelock s argument at all instead, what he argues is that Gaia, or Earth, is a self sustaining system with in built feedback loops which hold itor less steady and capable of supporting life.If you ve studied climate or geology or even the water cycle, you know that he s not wrong about the self sustaining system There s so many negative feedback loops which keep things in check some of which are, of course, threatening to be sabotaged by the action of one particular upstart mammal species with delusions of grandeur We re a part of the system, of course, but one which may have got out of hand Or maybe not maybe our intelligence will help rein us back in We can only hope.The point is, Lovelock s not saying anything about a cosy loving Earth Mother spirit watching over us Though his language in this book is sometimes poetical, and his sense of wonder at nature is clear, he s talking about self regulating, self sustaining systems He s talking about the fact that the world has checks and balances in place which bring Earth into equilibrium, even though other factors like the sun s energy output have changed over time And okay, at some points he goes off on a tangent about whale intelligence and a hypothetical future in which whale brains give us technological advances, but the science here isn t wrong.There s nothing actually revolutionary or tree hugging here It s just true Call it Gaia or call it a complex set of feedback loops whatever you re comfortable with, I guess I do wish I d read Revenge of Gaia instead, since this is horribly optimistic that humans will pull our collective fingers out and stop damaging the planet I suspect Lovelock s less sanguine about that prospect now.Originally reviewed for breathesbooks.com In Gaia, first published in 1979, Lovelock describes the planet and all living things on it as a self regulating entity, much like a collection of cells, organs, and bacteria together produce a living entity that we might think of as a person My favorite thing about Gaia theory is that I paradoxically intuit that it s obviously ridiculous but also that it s obviously correct.Readers new to this theory and book might do well to start in two places outside the introduction In the epilogue, Lovel In Gaia, first published in 1979, Lovelock describes the planet and all living things on it as a self regulating entity, much like a collection of cells, organs, and bacteria together produce a living entity that we might think of as a person My favorite thing about Gaia theory is that I paradoxically intuit that it s obviously ridiculous but also that it s obviously correct.Readers new to this theory and book might do well to start in two places outside the introduction In the epilogue, Lovelock explains that the Gaia Hypothesis postulates that the physical and chemical condition of surface of the Earth, of the atmosphere, and of the oceans has been and is actively made fit and comfortable by the presence of life itself This is in contrast to the conventional wisdom which held that life adapted to the planetary conditions as it and they evolved their separate ways This last distinction is useful to keep in mind when reading the other chapters, which at first glance seem needlessly wonky I also found the chapter on cybernetics a useful foundation for understanding Gaia Lovelock defines cybernetics as self regulating systems of communication and control in living organisms and machines Put this way, it does seem obvious that the planet should be understood as one massive web of interconnected systems.How should we think about humanity within this Gaia framework Lovelock considers two ecological views Ren Dubos has powerfully expressed the concept of man as the steward to life on Earth, in symbiosis with it like some grand gardener for all the world It is a hopeful, optimistic view and a liberal one In contrast to Dubos, Garrett Hardin apparently sees man as acting out a great tragedy which may lead not only to his own destruction but to the that of the whole world He suggests that our only means of escape is to renounce most of our technology, especially nuclear energy, but he seems to doubt whether we have free choice Lovelock, however, isinclined in this work to decrease human exceptionalism, which would counter the grandeur of Dubos view People are just another planetary entity He is alsooptimistic about technology than Hardin and would go on to defend nuclear energy in his later life which has extended to 100 years as I write this review.It s maybe worth noting that Lovelock is optimistic about humanity s use of technology in relation to the environment because people listen so carefully to journalists and act to mitigate their impact He writes that the rapid dissemination of information about the environment helps to reduce the time constant of our response to adverse changes Given how often today s political elites ignore or dismiss both scholars and the press, and given how much online media now seems undermined by misinformation troll and bot armies, we might laugh at this optimism But for Lovelock, it must have seemed sensible when seeing how readily the liberal democracies responded to Rachel Carson s Silent Spring and to Crutzen s work on the ozone layer the Montreal Protocol was passed within ten years At one point, he criticizes environmentalists for underestimating their impact in producing countervailing responses to their concerns, but he foresaw no backlash against environmentalism, the academy, or journalism Nathaniel Rich s Losing Earth The Decade We Almost Stopped Climate Change might be a useful counter to Lovelock s implicit prediction here Random Notes I was surprised by how often I recognized the scholars and scientific history here As noted, Carson Silent Spring, Crutzen Anthropocene , Dubos think globally, act locally , and Hardin The Tragedy of the Commons appear Lyn Margulis helps to write and develop the hypothesis and its ideas are first published in her ex husband Carl Sagan s journal Milutin Milankovi is mentioned Richard Dawkins skepticism of the Gaia hypothesis is mentioned in the introduction of the edition I read William Golding, who wrote Lord of the Flies, suggests using Gaia to name the theory Arthur C Clarke is quoted Lovelock begins thinking about how to recognize life while helping NASA to create probes to study the possibility of life on Mars The scientists at this time can remember working on what gases most likely warmed the planet in the distant past, not ammonia but carbon dioxide And they are still working out the atmospheric role of aerosols even if they have already figured out that CFCs are harmful to the ozone layer A final note in spite of Lovelock s at least tangential connection to Carl Sagan, he always writes 1000 million rather than a billion As an ecologist and all round nature lover I am rather familiar with Lovelock s Gaia concept, one that I have not been wholly convinced by And this book has done nothing to help that While I do like the idea of nature being an actual single entity being organism deliberately managing the planet for the benefit of all species, this is a belief and not something that can or should be applied to science or visa versa for that matter Lovelock s explanations of many of the basic Earth systems we As an ecologist and all round nature lover I am rather familiar with Lovelock s Gaia concept, one that I have not been wholly convinced by And this book has done nothing to help that While I do like the idea of nature being an actual single entity being organism deliberately managing the planet for the benefit of all species, this is a belief and not something that can or should be applied to science or visa versa for that matter Lovelock s explanations of many of the basic Earth systems were good, relatively easy to read and accompanied by useful examples relating them to processes systems that those without a lot of environmental knowledge can understand And for this I commend him However the way he fit these together to provide evidence for his Gaia hypothesis came across forced and comparable to some of the arguments put forward by the Creationists, although they are somewhatlogicalbut only just For me this is not a scientific theory but a belief idea that has its basis in the religions of old, Wiccan being a good example Disagree with Gaia Hypothesis did not means this book is bad written Lovelock gave me insight about how to use chemistry and thermodynamics as analytical tool. This book was challenging for me due to the high focus on the chemical processes of the earth and atmosphere I was hoping this focus would drop off after the first few chapters, but Lovelock continues it throughout the book However, I don t think this will present a problem to those studied in chemistry on a basic level The hypothesis seemed a little outdated to me as I think the thought of the earth being one large living organism has pretty much seeped into most of our understanding by now This book was challenging for me due to the high focus on the chemical processes of the earth and atmosphere I was hoping this focus would drop off after the first few chapters, but Lovelock continues it throughout the book However, I don t think this will present a problem to those studied in chemistry on a basic level The hypothesis seemed a little outdated to me as I think the thought of the earth being one large living organism has pretty much seeped into most of our understanding by now I did, however, especially enjoy the chapter on cybernetics One great, ingenious concept stretched out over a whole book By reading the introduction and the last chapter you have a whole summary of the purpose of the book and the ideas behind it The idea itself is truly fascinating and I think I have come to agree with Lovelock Love the concept, however the book gets very tedious and repetitive. Seminal Not at all what the treehuggers and New Agers think it is. "/>
  • Paperback
  • 176 pages
  • Gaia: A New Look at Life on Earth
  • James E. Lovelock
  • 14 March 2019
  • 0192862189